Turibius de Mogrovejo, B

+ Lk 11: 14-23

He was driving out a demon (that was) mute, and when the demon had gone out, the mute person spoke and the crowds were amazed.

Some of them said, “By the power of Beelzebul, the prince of demons, he drives out demons.”

Others, to test him, asked him for a sign from heaven.

But he knew their thoughts and said to them, “Every kingdom divided against itself will be laid waste and house will fall against house.

And if Satan is divided against himself, how will his kingdom stand? For you say that it is by Beelzebul that I drive out demons.

If I, then, drive out demons by Beelzebul, by whom do your own people  drive them out? Therefore they will be your judges.

But if it is by the finger of God that (I) drive out demons, then the kingdom of God has come upon you.

When a strong man fully armed guards his palace, his possessions are safe.

But when one stronger  than he attacks and overcomes him, he takes away the armor on which he relied and distributes the spoils.

Whoever is not with me is against me, and whoever does not gather with me scatters.

The New American Bible

The Catechism of the Catholic Church

700 The finger. “It is by the finger of God that [Jesus] cast out demons.” If God’s law was written on tablets of stone “by the finger of God,” then the “letter from Christ” entrusted to the care of the apostles, is written “with the Spirit of the living God, not on tablets of stone, but on tablets of human hearts.” The hymn Veni Creator Spiritus invokes the Holy Spirit as the “finger of the Father’s right hand.”

385 God is infinitely good and all his works are good. Yet no one can escape the experience of suffering or the evils in nature which seem to be linked to the limitations proper to creatures: and above all to the question of moral evil. Where does evil come from? “I sought whence evil comes and there was no solution”, said St. Augustine, and his own painful quest would only be resolved by his conversion to the living God. For “the mystery of lawlessness” is clarified only in the light of the “mystery of our religion”. The revelation of divine love in Christ manifested at the same time the extent of evil and the superabundance of grace. We must therefore approach the question of the origin of evil by fixing the eyes of our faith on him who alone is its conqueror.

Saint Turibius

Turibius of Mogrovejo (or Toribio Alfonso de Mogrovejo or Toribio de Lima) (16 November 1538 – 23 March 1606) was a Spanish missionary Archbishop of Lima.

Biography

Born in Mayorga de Campos, Valladolid, Spain, of noble family and highly educated, Turibius was named after another Spanish saint, Turibius of Astorga. He became professor of law at the highly reputed University of Salamanca. His learning and virtuous reputation led to his appointment as Grand Inquisitor of Spain by King Philip II on the Court of the Inquisition at Granada. During this time, he was ordained priest in 1578 and sent to Peru. On May 16, 1579, he was named Archbishop of Lima by Pope Gregory XIII and consecrated bishop in August 1580 by Cristóbal Rojas Sandoval, Archbishop of Seville.

He arrived at Paita, Peru, 600 miles (970 km) from Lima, on 24 May 1581. He began his mission work by travelling to Lima on foot, baptizing and teaching the natives. His favourite topic was: “Time is not our own, and we must give a strict account of it.” Three times he traversed the 450,000 square kilometers (170,000 sq mi) of his diocese, generally on foot, frequently defenceless and often alone; exposed to tempests, torrents, deserts, wild beasts, tropical heat, fevers and sometimes threats from hostile tribes; baptizing and confirming nearly one half million souls, among them St. Rose of Lima and St. Martin de Porres.

He built roads, schoolhouses and chapels, many hospitals and convents, and at Lima, in 1591, founded the first seminary in the western hemisphere. He inaugurated the first part of the third Lima Cathedral on 2 February 1604.

Turibius assembled thirteen diocesan synods and three provincial councils. He was seen as a champion of the rights of the natives against the Spanish masters. “There was great opposition to Turibius from the governors of Peru whose authority he challenged,” Elizabeth Hallam has written. “He learned local dialects so that he could communicate with–-and convert–-the native peoples, and he was a strong and effective champion of their rights.”

Years before he died, he predicted the day and hour of his death. At Pacasmayo he contracted fever, but continued labouring to the last, arriving at Sana (or Saña) in a dying condition. Dragging himself to the sanctuary he received the Viaticum, expiring shortly after on 23 March 1606.

While bishop, he was the principal Consecrator of Alfonso Guerra (bishop), third Bishop of Paraguay; Bartolomé Martinez Menacho y Mesa, Bishop of Panamá; Alfonso Fernández de Bonilla, Archbishop of México; Luis López de Solís, Bishop of Quito; Alonso Ramírez Vergara, Bishop of La Plata o Charcas; Reginaldo de Lizárraga, Bishop of Concepción; and Juan de La Roca, Bishop of Popayán.

Source: Wikipedia

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